How the bladder works?

The bladder is a hollow muscular organ shaped like a balloon. It sits in your pelvis and is held in place by ligaments attached to other organs and the pelvic bones. The bladder stores urine until you are ready to go to the bathroom to empty it. It swells into a round shape when it is full and gets smaller when empty. If the urinary system is healthy, the bladder can hold up to 16 ounces (2 cups) of urine comfortably for 2 to 5 hours.

Circular muscles called sphincters help keep urine from leaking. The sphincter muscles close tightly like a rubber band around the opening of the bladder into the urethra, the tube that allows urine to pass outside the body.

Nerves in the bladder tell you when it is time to urinate, or empty your bladder. As the bladder first fills with urine, you may notice a feeling that you need to urinate. The sensation to urinate becomes stronger as the bladder continues to fill and reaches its limit. At that point, nerves from the bladder send a message to the brain that the bladder is full, and your urge to empty your bladder intensifies. When you urinate, the brain signals the bladder muscles to tighten, squeezing urine out of the bladder. At the same time, the brain signals the sphincter muscles to relax. As these muscles relax, urine exits the bladder through the urethra. When all the signals occur in the correct order, normal urination occurs.

What causes problems in the urinary system?

Problems in the urinary system can be caused by aging, illness, or injury. As you get older, changes in the kidneys’ structure cause them to lose some of their ability to remove wastes from the blood. Also, the muscles in your ureters, bladder, and urethra tend to lose some of their strength. You may have more urinary infections because the bladder muscles do not tighten enough to empty your bladder completely. A decrease in strength of muscles of the sphincters and the pelvis can also cause incontinence, the unwanted leakage of urine. Illness or injury can also prevent the kidneys from filtering the blood completely or block the passage of urine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

In clinical trials, UriVarx™ has been used safely with minor side effects for up to 8 weeks. There were no adverse events leading to discontinuation. Five episodes of transient adverse reactions were reported in the UriVarx™ group which included diarrhea (2.9%), UTI (2.9%) and flatulence (1.5%). Pregnant women and women who are nursing should not take supplements without first talking to their doctor.

SUGGESTED USE: As a dietary supplement, start with one capsules a day in the morning with a meal or as directed by your healthcare practitioner. IF well tolerated you may increase to two capsules a day.
WARNINGS: Not for use in persons under the age of 18. Ask your doctor before using UriVarx™. Do not use if allergic to any ingredient in UriVarx™. Stop using if you experience any side effect.
CAUTION: Keep tightly closed in a cool dry place at controlled room temperature of 15°-30°C (59°-86°F). DO NOT USE if inner seal or outer neck band is broken. Keep out of the reach of children.